Pertussis

Pertussis has made a big comeback in recent years.
“Most pertussis-related deaths occur in infants too young to be immunized. . . .
All pregnant women are advised to get the Tdap vaccine, which protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough. . . .
A different version of the vaccine is given only to children starting at 2 months of age.
. . .by receiving the Tdap during gestation, the babies get high concentrations of pertussis antibodies . . . it is likely to be protective during the first two months, before they are able to get their own vaccinations.”

Protecting Newborns Against Whooping Cough

All pregnant women are advised to get the Tdap vaccine, which protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough. A small study suggests the vaccine may have benefits for newborns as well.

A different version of the vaccine is given only to children starting at 2 months of age; most pertussis-related deaths occur in infants too young to be immunized.

In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, researchers randomized 33 pregnant women to a vaccination at 30 to 32 weeks gestation, and 15 to a placebo shot.

The researchers found no serious side effects in any of the women or infants, and there were no cases of pertussis in either group. But women in the vaccination group had high concentrations of pertussis antibodies, and so did their newborn babies. That did not substantially affect the babies’ response to the recommended four doses of the infant version of the vaccine given from age 2 months to 13 months.

“We have shown that by receiving the Tdap during gestation, the babies get high concentrations of pertussis antibodies,” said Dr. Flor M. Munoz of Baylor College of Medicine, the lead author of the JAMA article. “This is likely to be protective during the first two months, before they are able to get their own vaccinations.”

Protecting Newborns Against Whooping Cough

image
Protecting Newborns Against Whooping Cough

Research suggests that pregnant women who get a vaccination to protect against tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough are helping their babies, too.
Preview by Yahoo

New patient care classes!

As a group, we embrace the many benefits of spontaneous labor:  a higher chance of a successful vaginal birth, typically faster labor and less painful early labor, and assurance that both your body and your baby are ready for birth.

 In our effort to decrease scheduled elective inductions for convenience, we recognize the importance of all of our patients feeling comfortable with all of our physicians and receiving consistent and compassionate care from our entire practice!
To achieve this, we are excited to institute our new plan for prenatal care.  In addition to your regular scheduled visits with your individual physician, you will also have the opportunity to participate in several group teaching/discussion visits.  The educational goals of these visits will include topics such as:
-details on nutrition and exercise in pregnancy
-breastfeeding – why it’s important and how to succeed
-expectations per trimester, review of potential pregnancy complications, and signs to watch for
-expectations in labor, comfort measures and pain management in labor
-postpartum expectations, nutrition, and postpartum depression
-and more!
Through these group visits you will have the opportunity to meet and get to know all of the physicians in our group.  You will also have the opportunity to meet with other moms and have more extensive discussions on issues that are important to you!
We look forward to caring for you and helping you to have a healthy pregnancy and birth.  Our desire to decrease elective inductions for best health practice is in accordance with recommendations by several leading medical societies including ACOG (American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology) and AAFP (American Academy of Family Physicians).  http://www.choosingwisely.org/doctor-patient-lists/american-college-of-obstetricians-and-gynecologists/

Life Begins @ 50 Expo

Great job to Dr. Renee Harris!  She was recently asked to be a guest speaker at the Life Begins @ 50 Expo on April 20, 2013 at the River Center in downtown Baton Rouge.  At the Expo, she represented Woman’s Hospital and gave a presentation discussing robotic hysterectomies.  Points discussed included the gynecological conditions that can lead to surgery and the different surgical techniques that can be used. The presentation was well attended and informative.

A hysterectomy is the removal of a woman’s uterus.  A robotic hysterectomy is a minimally invasive surgical method of removing a woman’s uterus.  Some medical conditions that may lead to the need for this surgery include heavy or irregular bleeding, pelvic pain, postmenopausal bleeding, cancer, uterine fibroids, endometriosis, and uterine prolapse that are not relieved by medical management.

Prior to minimally invasive surgery, a hysterectomy was performed either through the patient’s abdomen or vagina.  If performed through the abdomen, postoperative difficulties may include increased pain, bleeding, wound infection, and requiring a longer hospital stay than compared to minimally invasive techniques.  With a robotic hysterectomy, a person can expect to go home the same day or the day after surgery and have a faster recovery period with smaller incisions and decreased pain.  There is also a reduced risk for complications like bleeding and infection.

Medical management is usually tried first to treat medical conditions.  However, if surgery is becoming the more favorable option, discuss with your doctor if you would be a good candidate for robotic surgery.

Start registering for the March of Dimes Walk!

We are excited to be participating in the March of Dimes walk being held April 27, 2013!  March of Dimes is a non-profit organization with a mission “to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth, and infant mortality.”

Babies born premature are put at risk for breathing difficulties, infections, cerebral palsy (learning disabilities), inability to regulate their body temperature to stay warm, vision problems, and hearing problems.  A term pregnancy is considered 37 weeks gestational age and above, however it has been shown, that if possible, it’s best to stay pregnant for at least 39 weeks to give baby time for all of his/her organs to grow to their maximum potential.

Recently, more and more pregnancies have been induced for non-medical reasons (called an elective induction), but, even if a pregnancy has reached 39 weeks, it still may not be beneficial for mom or baby to be induced.  Elective inductions may not work, requiring the baby to be delivered by a cesarean section.  Babies born by cesarean section may have more breathing problems than babies born by vaginal delivery.  Also, this puts the mom at risk for requiring a cesarean section in the next pregnancy. With each future cesarean section, the mom and baby are put at more risk.  For these reasons, it is better to wait for mom to go into labor spontaneously rather than be induced, as long as the mom is healthy and the pregnancy is progressing well.  Secondary to the benefits research has shown about spontaneous labor, it is our group policy to not do non-medical inductions.

Our doctors support the mission of March of Dimes and have seen the importance of keeping moms pregnant with their babies for as long as possible.    Please help support March of Dimes and meet us out at the walk on April 27, 2013.  The walk starts at 9:15 am and registration begins at 7:30 am.  We look forward to seeing you there!

For more information, please visit the March of Dimes website at www.marchofdimes.com.

Welcome to our new website!

Thank you for visiting our new site!  We are happy to get to share with you our commitment to compassionate women’s care.  We are a private practice group made up of eight female physicians specialized in obstetrics and gynecology.  Please take your time and peruse our site to discover what all we have to offer.  Also, make sure to continue to check in our blog where we will keep you up to date with the latest information and advancements in the field of OB/GYN.  We look forward to seeing you soon!  Our office number is 225-201-0505.